Relics Romano style, Mérida, Spain

In En-Route, Europe, Our Journeys, Spain, Trip-Types, Unesco, World Travel by JanisLeave a Comment

Walk in Roman footsteps

What is amazing about this ancient site is that it is yours to discover. You’re free to tread the boards of whence thespians performed or brush shoulders along the shadowy passages of where armoured gladiators clashed.

Memories of the movie Gladiator spring to mind.

The Roman theatre, Mérida, Spain

The Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida was inscribed onto the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1993.

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Teatro

The site where the imposing theatre stands today, was originally constructed between 16 and 15 BC. Further significant renovations were undertaken around the end of the 1st century and beginning of the 2nd century, which included the main façade.

Impressive columns of the Roman theatre, Mérida, Spain

The big dig

It wasn’t until the late 19th century that a full excavation of the site was carried out, as centuries of earth had slowly been swallowing up the ancient ruins. Prior to this only the upper tiers of the seating were visible.

A panoramic view of the Roman theatre, Mérida, Spain

Why not?

Start creating your own Spanish adventure and discover its historical towns and cities for yourself, easyJet & British Airways are just a couple of options.

No comfy seating

The towering semicircular seating around the theatre, would originally have been built to accommodate 6,000 people. The Roman upper section still remains encircling the theatre, and the lower tiers have since been replaced.

Looking back at the audience, Mérida, Spain

The first rows of seating would have been frequented by the higher social classes of the time, with the marbled semicircular orchestra in front.

Witness it yourself

Audiences are now being entertained annually and have been since 1933, within these magnificent ruins. The classical performances form part of the Mérida Classical Theatre Festival.

The theatre from the cheap seats, Mérida, Spain

Anfiteatro

In 8 BC the Romans constructed the amphitheater, which was built adjacent to the theatre. This impressive arena, of which a large portion can still be seen today, originally would have seated 15,000 spectators.

The full view of the amphitheatre, Mérida, Spain

Tempted to?

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Gladiators

You are able to wander around the upper section of the amphitheatre, which then leads you down through a tunnel onto the arena floor itself. Bypassing a depiction of the styles of attire, that an 8th century BC gladiator would have worn to combat.

The walk to the amphitheatre, Mérida, Spain

Not only would Romans have been entertained with different categories of gladiatorial fighting, they were also known to have fought animals (beasts).

The animals were kept under the centre section of the arena known as fossa bestiaria. They were stored within the multiple rooms and tunnels, prior to them being released to fight.

The gladiator's arena, Mérida, Spain

Although now not quite politically correct, but to witness the striking ancient stadium was not to be missed.

Inspired to visit Mérida?

Although we didn’t stay in Mérida, we would consider it for another trip. There’s plenty of history in this town.

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About the Author

Janis

Janis, the co-founder of Our World for You, was born in London and raised in Kent and the Isle of Wight. Along with Gary her partner, they have been travelling part time since 1995. In 2016, they decided that enough was enough with the 9 to 5, so armed with the knowledge and experience that they had gained on their adventures, that they wanted to inspire others to travel the world near and far.

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